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I love India, don’t you dare call me anti-nationalist : Irrfan Khan’s son

Sabrangindia 31 Jul 2020

Babil Khan, son of deceased actor Irrfan Khan, recently expressed his anger on his social media account saying his friends had stopped talking to him because of his religion. Other social media users reacted to his post wondering if privileged members of the minority community like Babil Khan were facing discrimination then what would be the situation of common Muslims.https://ssl.gstatic.com/ui/v1/icons/mail/images/cleardot.gif

In a series of posts, Babil even expressed his frustration over not being able to speak about the present regime as he feared his career would be ruined.

“Can’t even post anything about how I feel about the people in power without my whole f**king team telling me that it might end my career. I am scared, I am afraid. I don’t want to be. I don’t want to be judged by my religion. I am not my religion, I am a human being, just like the rest of India,” he wrote.

While speaking about the discrimination he was facing, he said, “Our beautiful secular India’s sudden relapse of religious divide is honestly getting scary. I have friends that have stopped communicating with me because I am of a certain religion. I miss my friends; my Hindu, Muslim, Christian, Sikh, human friends…I love India, don’t you dare call me anti-nationalist. I promise you, I am a boxer, I will break your nose”. Babil is a student of cinema and aspires to pursue a career in the film industry in India.

Social media responded while one user saying, “The abuses and discrimination against Irfan Khan's son babil because of his religion is just an example that even the privileged minorities aren't spared of the communal hatred by the majority. The silence because of your privilege will just hurt you in the end.”

 

 

Another user said, “Irrfan's son Babil writes that his friends have stopped talking to him anymore because of his religion. Just another glimpse of where we have come, what we have become.”

 

 

 



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I love India, don’t you dare call me anti-nationalist : Irrfan Khan’s son

The late actor’s son said his friends stopped talking to him due to his religion and that he was scared to speak about the government

Babil Khan, son of deceased actor Irrfan Khan, recently expressed his anger on his social media account saying his friends had stopped talking to him because of his religion. Other social media users reacted to his post wondering if privileged members of the minority community like Babil Khan were facing discrimination then what would be the situation of common Muslims.https://ssl.gstatic.com/ui/v1/icons/mail/images/cleardot.gif

In a series of posts, Babil even expressed his frustration over not being able to speak about the present regime as he feared his career would be ruined.

“Can’t even post anything about how I feel about the people in power without my whole f**king team telling me that it might end my career. I am scared, I am afraid. I don’t want to be. I don’t want to be judged by my religion. I am not my religion, I am a human being, just like the rest of India,” he wrote.

While speaking about the discrimination he was facing, he said, “Our beautiful secular India’s sudden relapse of religious divide is honestly getting scary. I have friends that have stopped communicating with me because I am of a certain religion. I miss my friends; my Hindu, Muslim, Christian, Sikh, human friends…I love India, don’t you dare call me anti-nationalist. I promise you, I am a boxer, I will break your nose”. Babil is a student of cinema and aspires to pursue a career in the film industry in India.

Social media responded while one user saying, “The abuses and discrimination against Irfan Khan's son babil because of his religion is just an example that even the privileged minorities aren't spared of the communal hatred by the majority. The silence because of your privilege will just hurt you in the end.”

 

 

Another user said, “Irrfan's son Babil writes that his friends have stopped talking to him anymore because of his religion. Just another glimpse of where we have come, what we have become.”

 

 

 



Related:

No Eid-ul-Adha prayers at AMU, other states list Dos and Dont’s

From Fauda to Ertugrul: Spreading radical agenda via entertainment

Bakrid and the forced controversy around animal sacrifice

 

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