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Aligarh Muslim University to include Sanatan Dharma and other religions in new course

University also removed two books that allegedly supported Islamic State

Sabrangindia 06 Aug 2022

AMU

The Aligarh Muslim University (AMU) has decided to include Sanatan Dharma, Buddhism, Jainism and other religions as part of a new course on comparative religions. So far, when it came to courses about religion, the University used to only offer courses in Islamic Studies.

Now, AMU spokesperson M Shafi Kidwai told Times of India, “In the new course, there will be lessons on the Vedas, Purans, Upanishads, Ramayana, Gita and other scriptures,” adding that the teachings of “Buddhism, Jainism, Sikhism, and other religions will also be there in the curriculum.”

However, India Today reports that the move has been met with some resistance. Former head of the university's Sunni Theology Department, Prof Mufti Zahid Ali Khan, told the publication that studies of other religions are not possible in the Islamic Studies department.

Meanwhile, the AMU has already decided to remove two texts from its syllabus – a book written by Maulana Abu Ala Maududi from Pakistan and another written by Syed Qutb of Egypt. The decision was taken in wake of a letter written by 20 educationists to the Prime Minister demanding a ban on the books for their alleged pro-Islamic State content.

While the decision is yet to be formally endorsed by the board of studies, Professor Mohammed Ismail, who is the Chairman of the department of Islamic Studies, told TOI, “We have decided to remove them from the course curriculum to avoid unnecessary controversy.” In fact, it was Professor Ismail who had moved the proposal to start the new course in comparative religion from the next session.

Founded on May 24, 1875 by Sir Syed Ahmed Khan, the AMU contrary to popular belief, isn’t an exclusively Muslim university, with students of all faiths from across India and even from Africa, West Asia and Southeast Asia enrolled here. The Islamic Studies department has been functioning since 1948, and at present, has over 1,000 students pursuing graduate, post graduate and PhD programs, according to Professor Ismail.

Related:

Aligarh college professor to face probe for namaz?

AMU: Sir Syed’s dream and reality

Aligarh Muslim University to include Sanatan Dharma and other religions in new course

University also removed two books that allegedly supported Islamic State

AMU

The Aligarh Muslim University (AMU) has decided to include Sanatan Dharma, Buddhism, Jainism and other religions as part of a new course on comparative religions. So far, when it came to courses about religion, the University used to only offer courses in Islamic Studies.

Now, AMU spokesperson M Shafi Kidwai told Times of India, “In the new course, there will be lessons on the Vedas, Purans, Upanishads, Ramayana, Gita and other scriptures,” adding that the teachings of “Buddhism, Jainism, Sikhism, and other religions will also be there in the curriculum.”

However, India Today reports that the move has been met with some resistance. Former head of the university's Sunni Theology Department, Prof Mufti Zahid Ali Khan, told the publication that studies of other religions are not possible in the Islamic Studies department.

Meanwhile, the AMU has already decided to remove two texts from its syllabus – a book written by Maulana Abu Ala Maududi from Pakistan and another written by Syed Qutb of Egypt. The decision was taken in wake of a letter written by 20 educationists to the Prime Minister demanding a ban on the books for their alleged pro-Islamic State content.

While the decision is yet to be formally endorsed by the board of studies, Professor Mohammed Ismail, who is the Chairman of the department of Islamic Studies, told TOI, “We have decided to remove them from the course curriculum to avoid unnecessary controversy.” In fact, it was Professor Ismail who had moved the proposal to start the new course in comparative religion from the next session.

Founded on May 24, 1875 by Sir Syed Ahmed Khan, the AMU contrary to popular belief, isn’t an exclusively Muslim university, with students of all faiths from across India and even from Africa, West Asia and Southeast Asia enrolled here. The Islamic Studies department has been functioning since 1948, and at present, has over 1,000 students pursuing graduate, post graduate and PhD programs, according to Professor Ismail.

Related:

Aligarh college professor to face probe for namaz?

AMU: Sir Syed’s dream and reality

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