Skip to main content
Sabrang
Sabrang
Communalism Politics

BJP’s election manifesto in Assam promises “corrected” NRC, end of “Love Jihad”

The deeply communal content is all that there is in this ‘Sankalp Patra’ that is otherwise full of old promises that the government has failed to deliver upon in the last five years

Sabrangindia 24 Mar 2021

BJP Assam

As the high-voltage election campaigning progresses in Assam, BJP released its Sankalp Patra or election manifesto for the state. The manifesto was launched by none other than BJP president JP Nadda in Guwahati in the presence of Assam Chief Minister Sarbananda Sonowal, state BJP President Ranjeet Kumar Dass, Health and Finance Minister Himanta Biswa Sarma, BJP National Vice President Jay Panda, and many other senior BJP leaders and ministers. 

Speaking on the occasion of the release, Nadda said, “We commit to work for a corrected NRC,” adding, “We will protect genuine Indian citizens and detect infiltrators.” This is interesting given how the party had rejected the updated National Register of Citizens (NRC) that was released on August 31, 2019. Though over 19 lakh people had been excluded from this list, the BJP-led Assam government had alleged that names of illegal Bangladeshi immigrants had been included in it. Though the NRC was a process monitored by the Supreme Court, the Assam government has vehemently refused to accept the NRC. Moreover, the Assam government has repeatedly demanded reverification despite the Supreme Court having refused the demand previously. 

Meanwhile a quick glance at the manifesto reveals that it is deeply communal and could cause further polarisation in the poll-bound state. For example, in the chapter titled Manifesto Highlights, promise number 8 says, “We will formulate appropriate laws and policies to take and end the menace of 'Love Jihad' and 'Land Jihad' in Assam.” This is shocking not only because Assamese society has always prided itself for the harmonious coexistence of people of different faiths in the state, but also because this kind of blatantly communal content was missing from previous manifestos and vision documents. The BJP manifesto for the upcoming Assembly Elections appears to have a rather divisive agenda.

Nadda also said, “Over the last five years the BJP government has worked tirelessly to protect Jati, Mati, Bheti (i.e. Assamese Nationality, Land of Assam, and Base of Assamese people).” He accused previous governments of leading the state into stagnation due to absence of both, desire and ability to solve problems of people of the state. Nadda credited the Sonowal administration for building a momentum for development. 

However, more than 40 percent of the promises recorded in Sankalp Patra appear to be promises made way back in 2016. For instance, in the manifesto, highlights start with sub chapter Protection of Civilization of Assam. In this first chapter the first promise of BJP is, “We will undertake all necessary efforts to further take ahead the process to provide ST status to the Tai Ahoms, Koch Rajbongshi, Chutia, Moran and Matak communities without hampering the existing reservations, rights and privileges of tribals in the state.” This is exactly what it promised five years ago in its vision document. Back then, BJP had said that it will take every step to give ST status to Tai Ahoms, Koch Rajbongshi, Chutia, Moran and Matak communities within six months after coming to power of the state. 

Not only this, the Sankalp Patra of BJP starts with 10 Sankalp for Atma Nirbhar Assam, in which the first Sankalp says, “The people of Assam will be free from the vagaries of floods.” But, five years ago the vision document of BJP had made the promised that problem of floods in Assam will be solved for ever within five years if it comes to power of the state. 

In this starting point of Sankalp Patra, BJP once again promises for dredging river Brahmaputra, which was also its electoral promise of 2016. Thus out 360 promises declared in Sankalp Patra of BJP, nearly half appear to be recycled versions of old and unfulfilled promises.


Related:

Assamese made a compulsory subject for non-Assamese school students

Deliberate attempt to communalise Assam assembly elections?

BJP’s election manifesto in Assam promises “corrected” NRC, end of “Love Jihad”

The deeply communal content is all that there is in this ‘Sankalp Patra’ that is otherwise full of old promises that the government has failed to deliver upon in the last five years

BJP Assam

As the high-voltage election campaigning progresses in Assam, BJP released its Sankalp Patra or election manifesto for the state. The manifesto was launched by none other than BJP president JP Nadda in Guwahati in the presence of Assam Chief Minister Sarbananda Sonowal, state BJP President Ranjeet Kumar Dass, Health and Finance Minister Himanta Biswa Sarma, BJP National Vice President Jay Panda, and many other senior BJP leaders and ministers. 

Speaking on the occasion of the release, Nadda said, “We commit to work for a corrected NRC,” adding, “We will protect genuine Indian citizens and detect infiltrators.” This is interesting given how the party had rejected the updated National Register of Citizens (NRC) that was released on August 31, 2019. Though over 19 lakh people had been excluded from this list, the BJP-led Assam government had alleged that names of illegal Bangladeshi immigrants had been included in it. Though the NRC was a process monitored by the Supreme Court, the Assam government has vehemently refused to accept the NRC. Moreover, the Assam government has repeatedly demanded reverification despite the Supreme Court having refused the demand previously. 

Meanwhile a quick glance at the manifesto reveals that it is deeply communal and could cause further polarisation in the poll-bound state. For example, in the chapter titled Manifesto Highlights, promise number 8 says, “We will formulate appropriate laws and policies to take and end the menace of 'Love Jihad' and 'Land Jihad' in Assam.” This is shocking not only because Assamese society has always prided itself for the harmonious coexistence of people of different faiths in the state, but also because this kind of blatantly communal content was missing from previous manifestos and vision documents. The BJP manifesto for the upcoming Assembly Elections appears to have a rather divisive agenda.

Nadda also said, “Over the last five years the BJP government has worked tirelessly to protect Jati, Mati, Bheti (i.e. Assamese Nationality, Land of Assam, and Base of Assamese people).” He accused previous governments of leading the state into stagnation due to absence of both, desire and ability to solve problems of people of the state. Nadda credited the Sonowal administration for building a momentum for development. 

However, more than 40 percent of the promises recorded in Sankalp Patra appear to be promises made way back in 2016. For instance, in the manifesto, highlights start with sub chapter Protection of Civilization of Assam. In this first chapter the first promise of BJP is, “We will undertake all necessary efforts to further take ahead the process to provide ST status to the Tai Ahoms, Koch Rajbongshi, Chutia, Moran and Matak communities without hampering the existing reservations, rights and privileges of tribals in the state.” This is exactly what it promised five years ago in its vision document. Back then, BJP had said that it will take every step to give ST status to Tai Ahoms, Koch Rajbongshi, Chutia, Moran and Matak communities within six months after coming to power of the state. 

Not only this, the Sankalp Patra of BJP starts with 10 Sankalp for Atma Nirbhar Assam, in which the first Sankalp says, “The people of Assam will be free from the vagaries of floods.” But, five years ago the vision document of BJP had made the promised that problem of floods in Assam will be solved for ever within five years if it comes to power of the state. 

In this starting point of Sankalp Patra, BJP once again promises for dredging river Brahmaputra, which was also its electoral promise of 2016. Thus out 360 promises declared in Sankalp Patra of BJP, nearly half appear to be recycled versions of old and unfulfilled promises.


Related:

Assamese made a compulsory subject for non-Assamese school students

Deliberate attempt to communalise Assam assembly elections?

Related Articles

Sunday

03

Jan

Pan-India

Saturday

05

Dec

05 pm onwards

Rise in Rage!

North Gate, JNU campus

Thursday

26

Nov

10 am onwards

Delhi Chalo

Pan India

Theme

Taliban 2021

Taliban in Afghanistan: A look back

Communalism Combat had taken a deep dive into the lives of people of Afghanistan under the Taliban regime. Here we reproduce some of our archives documenting the plight of hapless Afghanis, especially women, who suffered the most under the hardline regime.
2020

Milestones 2020

In the year devastated by the Covid 19 Pandemic, India witnessed apathy against some of its most marginalised people and vilification of dissenters by powerful state and non state actors. As 2020 draws to a close, and hundreds of thousands of Indian farmers continue their protest in the bitter North Indian cold. Read how Indians resisted all attempts to snatch away fundamental and constitutional freedoms.
Migrant Diaries

Migrant Diaries

The 2020 COVID pandemic brought to fore the dismal lives that our migrant workers lead. Read these heartbreaking stories of how they lived before the pandemic, how the lockdown changed their lives and what they’re doing now.
Delhi HC

Hate Speech and Delhi Pogrom 2020

A spate of provocative speeches, that amount to hate speech in law and should be prosecuted allowed blood letting to spill on the streets of north east Delhi in February-March 2020

Campaigns

Sunday

03

Jan

Pan-India

Saturday

05

Dec

05 pm onwards

Rise in Rage!

North Gate, JNU campus

Thursday

26

Nov

10 am onwards

Delhi Chalo

Pan India

Videos

Dalit Bahujan Adivasi

Why are Adivasis protesting against power projects in Ajodhya Hills?

Adivasis and local residents, opposed to the newly proposed hydel power project in the remote Ajodhya Hills in West Bengal, are heightening their prolonged protests against these projects. Watch this sabrangindia exclusive to hear what Adivasi Activists, local residents, forest dwellers and environmentalists have to say.

Dalit Bahujan Adivasi

Why are Adivasis protesting against power projects in Ajodhya Hills?

Adivasis and local residents, opposed to the newly proposed hydel power project in the remote Ajodhya Hills in West Bengal, are heightening their prolonged protests against these projects. Watch this sabrangindia exclusive to hear what Adivasi Activists, local residents, forest dwellers and environmentalists have to say.

IN FACT

Analysis

Taliban 2021

Taliban in Afghanistan: A look back

Communalism Combat had taken a deep dive into the lives of people of Afghanistan under the Taliban regime. Here we reproduce some of our archives documenting the plight of hapless Afghanis, especially women, who suffered the most under the hardline regime.
2020

Milestones 2020

In the year devastated by the Covid 19 Pandemic, India witnessed apathy against some of its most marginalised people and vilification of dissenters by powerful state and non state actors. As 2020 draws to a close, and hundreds of thousands of Indian farmers continue their protest in the bitter North Indian cold. Read how Indians resisted all attempts to snatch away fundamental and constitutional freedoms.
Migrant Diaries

Migrant Diaries

The 2020 COVID pandemic brought to fore the dismal lives that our migrant workers lead. Read these heartbreaking stories of how they lived before the pandemic, how the lockdown changed their lives and what they’re doing now.
Delhi HC

Hate Speech and Delhi Pogrom 2020

A spate of provocative speeches, that amount to hate speech in law and should be prosecuted allowed blood letting to spill on the streets of north east Delhi in February-March 2020

Archives