Skip to main content
Sabrang
Sabrang
Politics

EC proposes lowering anonymous political donations from Rs 20,000 to Rs 2,000

Currently, political parties have to disclose all donations above Rs 20000

Sameer Khan 20 Sep 2022

Election comission

New Delhi: Aiming for reforms and transparency in donations received by political parties, the Election Commission has proposed reducing anonymous political donations from Rs 20,000 to Rs 2,000.

Sources said that the poll panel wrote a letter to the Union Law Ministry recommending various amendments in the Representation of the People Act.

Recently, the Commission delisted 284 non-compliant registered unrecognised political parties (RUPPs), declaring more than 253 of them inactive. Earlier, the Income Tax Department raided a number of such entities across the country on charges of tax evasion.

Currently, political parties have to disclose all donations above Rs 20,000 through their contribution report that is submitted to the EC.

Sources said that the Commission has proposed lowering the threshold limit for cash donations made to political parties from Rs 20,000 to Rs 2,000. In case the proposal gets approved, all donations above Rs 2,000 will be part of the contribution report which is submitted to the Commission.

There are a few political parties which have shown contributions above Rs 20,000 as nil, while their audited accounts statement showed receipt of huge amounts – all less than the limit of Rs 20,000.

The poll panel has also proposed to limit cash donations at 20 per cent or at a maximum of Rs 20 crore to cleanse election funding of black money.

Sources said that the proposed amendments will also lead to maintaining a separate account for receipt and payments related to elections by the candidate and the same has to be transparently disclosed to authorities as election expenditure.

Moreover, the Commission also wants every candidate to open a separate bank account for poll purposes which will have all the details related to all expenses and receipts as part of the election expenditure.

Sources said that electoral reforms proposed by the Election Commission also include segregation of foreign funds from the funds of the parties for more transparency into funding to political parties.

Courtesy: The Daily Siasat

EC proposes lowering anonymous political donations from Rs 20,000 to Rs 2,000

Currently, political parties have to disclose all donations above Rs 20000

Election comission

New Delhi: Aiming for reforms and transparency in donations received by political parties, the Election Commission has proposed reducing anonymous political donations from Rs 20,000 to Rs 2,000.

Sources said that the poll panel wrote a letter to the Union Law Ministry recommending various amendments in the Representation of the People Act.

Recently, the Commission delisted 284 non-compliant registered unrecognised political parties (RUPPs), declaring more than 253 of them inactive. Earlier, the Income Tax Department raided a number of such entities across the country on charges of tax evasion.

Currently, political parties have to disclose all donations above Rs 20,000 through their contribution report that is submitted to the EC.

Sources said that the Commission has proposed lowering the threshold limit for cash donations made to political parties from Rs 20,000 to Rs 2,000. In case the proposal gets approved, all donations above Rs 2,000 will be part of the contribution report which is submitted to the Commission.

There are a few political parties which have shown contributions above Rs 20,000 as nil, while their audited accounts statement showed receipt of huge amounts – all less than the limit of Rs 20,000.

The poll panel has also proposed to limit cash donations at 20 per cent or at a maximum of Rs 20 crore to cleanse election funding of black money.

Sources said that the proposed amendments will also lead to maintaining a separate account for receipt and payments related to elections by the candidate and the same has to be transparently disclosed to authorities as election expenditure.

Moreover, the Commission also wants every candidate to open a separate bank account for poll purposes which will have all the details related to all expenses and receipts as part of the election expenditure.

Sources said that electoral reforms proposed by the Election Commission also include segregation of foreign funds from the funds of the parties for more transparency into funding to political parties.

Courtesy: The Daily Siasat

Related Articles

Communalism

Gandhi as “evil” (Mahiasura) is a time-tested narrative for all hues of Hindu communalists

The latest depiction of Mahatma Gandhi as ‘Mahiasura’ at the All India’s Hindu Mahasaha’s puja pandal in Kolkatta is a time-tested narrative of Hindu communalists who, as Teesta Setalvad has writen, regurgitate this narrative portraying Gandhi as different forms of “evil”

Communalism

Gandhi as “evil” (Mahiasura) is a time-tested narrative for all hues of Hindu communalists

The latest depiction of Mahatma Gandhi as ‘Mahiasura’ at the All India’s Hindu Mahasaha’s puja pandal in Kolkatta is a time-tested narrative of Hindu communalists who, as Teesta Setalvad has writen, regurgitate this narrative portraying Gandhi as different forms of “evil”


Sunday

03

Jan

Pan-India

Saturday

05

Dec

05 pm onwards

Rise in Rage!

North Gate, JNU campus

Thursday

26

Nov

10 am onwards

Delhi Chalo

Pan India

Theme

Stop Hate

Hate and Harmony in 2021

A recap of all that transpired across India in terms of hate speech and even outright hate crimes, as well as the persecution of those who dared to speak up against hate. This disturbing harvest of hate should now push us to do more to forge harmony.
Taliban 2021

Taliban in Afghanistan: A look back

Communalism Combat had taken a deep dive into the lives of people of Afghanistan under the Taliban regime. Here we reproduce some of our archives documenting the plight of hapless Afghanis, especially women, who suffered the most under the hardline regime.
2020

Milestones 2020

In the year devastated by the Covid 19 Pandemic, India witnessed apathy against some of its most marginalised people and vilification of dissenters by powerful state and non state actors. As 2020 draws to a close, and hundreds of thousands of Indian farmers continue their protest in the bitter North Indian cold. Read how Indians resisted all attempts to snatch away fundamental and constitutional freedoms.
Migrant Diaries

Migrant Diaries

The 2020 COVID pandemic brought to fore the dismal lives that our migrant workers lead. Read these heartbreaking stories of how they lived before the pandemic, how the lockdown changed their lives and what they’re doing now.

Campaigns

Sunday

03

Jan

Pan-India

Saturday

05

Dec

05 pm onwards

Rise in Rage!

North Gate, JNU campus

Thursday

26

Nov

10 am onwards

Delhi Chalo

Pan India

IN FACT

Analysis

Stop Hate

Hate and Harmony in 2021

A recap of all that transpired across India in terms of hate speech and even outright hate crimes, as well as the persecution of those who dared to speak up against hate. This disturbing harvest of hate should now push us to do more to forge harmony.
Taliban 2021

Taliban in Afghanistan: A look back

Communalism Combat had taken a deep dive into the lives of people of Afghanistan under the Taliban regime. Here we reproduce some of our archives documenting the plight of hapless Afghanis, especially women, who suffered the most under the hardline regime.
2020

Milestones 2020

In the year devastated by the Covid 19 Pandemic, India witnessed apathy against some of its most marginalised people and vilification of dissenters by powerful state and non state actors. As 2020 draws to a close, and hundreds of thousands of Indian farmers continue their protest in the bitter North Indian cold. Read how Indians resisted all attempts to snatch away fundamental and constitutional freedoms.
Migrant Diaries

Migrant Diaries

The 2020 COVID pandemic brought to fore the dismal lives that our migrant workers lead. Read these heartbreaking stories of how they lived before the pandemic, how the lockdown changed their lives and what they’re doing now.

Archives