Skip to main content
Sabrang
Sabrang
Environment Dalit Bahujan Adivasi

Nearly 20 days later, MoEFCC shares FCA proposal in regional languages

While the amendment proposal is now available in local languages, the Ministry states it stands by the English interpretation

Sabrangindia 21 Oct 2021

Forest ( Conservation) ActImage Courtesy:indianbureaucracy.com

Proposed amendments to the Forest (Conservation) Act 1980 are now available in 11 regional languages including Hindi on the Ministry of Environment, Forest and Climate Change (MoEFCC) website.

On Thursday morning, the website showed versions of the proposal paper in Kannada, Hindi, Marathi, Nepali, Telugu, Malayalam, Odia, Punjabi, Manipuri, Bengali and Gujarati languages.

In a circular by the forest conservation division, officials said, “The consultation paper inviting comments of stakeholders on proposed amendment in Forest (Conservation) Act, 1980 has been uploaded in the Ministry's website and PARIVESH portal in Hindi and English languages. Subsequently, this consultation paper has been translated into various regional languages and such versions have been uploaded on the above two portals.”

The Ministry said that in case of any difference in interpretation between English and any other language in which the paper has been translated, the interpretation in the English version will be followed. 

It is noteworthy that the versions came 10 days after the Ministry extended the deadline for comments to November 1. The proposal was first introduced in English on October 2, 2021 on Gandhi Jayanti – a public holiday. 

Largely, the changes propose doing away with the requirement for government approval for industrial or commercial projects in forest areas while also switching projects that are considered “non-forestry” like mining. Adivasis and environmental activists across India had criticised the government for quietly sending the proposal to state governments in English alone. This excluded many concerned communities from the decision-making stage.

This is not the first time the Ministry has discreetly suggested changes to forest laws. On Wednesday, writing for the Morning Context, Akshay Deshmane reported that the Ministry had just scrapped a previous decision to invite private entities to amend the Indian Forest Act 1927. 

According to experts, these amendments would have given the central government more control over forested areas that nowadays enjoy local maintenance and conservation efforts. However, unlike the other forest Acts, the law bestows powers to the state government while dismissing forest-dwellers from decisions regarding the use and demarcation of forests. According to the aforementioned Morning Context report, the ministry has not given up on amending the law,just done away with the idea of bringing in private entities.

Related:

Jal, Jungle, Zameen: Chhattisgarh Adivasis march 300kms to oppose coal mining projects
Dilution of environmental laws, a persistent tactic: AIUFWP
India farmers, Adivasis and forest dwellers condemn FCA draft changes
Forest Conservation Act: GoI suggests fundamental changes Act, despite widespread objections

 

Nearly 20 days later, MoEFCC shares FCA proposal in regional languages

While the amendment proposal is now available in local languages, the Ministry states it stands by the English interpretation

Forest ( Conservation) ActImage Courtesy:indianbureaucracy.com

Proposed amendments to the Forest (Conservation) Act 1980 are now available in 11 regional languages including Hindi on the Ministry of Environment, Forest and Climate Change (MoEFCC) website.

On Thursday morning, the website showed versions of the proposal paper in Kannada, Hindi, Marathi, Nepali, Telugu, Malayalam, Odia, Punjabi, Manipuri, Bengali and Gujarati languages.

In a circular by the forest conservation division, officials said, “The consultation paper inviting comments of stakeholders on proposed amendment in Forest (Conservation) Act, 1980 has been uploaded in the Ministry's website and PARIVESH portal in Hindi and English languages. Subsequently, this consultation paper has been translated into various regional languages and such versions have been uploaded on the above two portals.”

The Ministry said that in case of any difference in interpretation between English and any other language in which the paper has been translated, the interpretation in the English version will be followed. 

It is noteworthy that the versions came 10 days after the Ministry extended the deadline for comments to November 1. The proposal was first introduced in English on October 2, 2021 on Gandhi Jayanti – a public holiday. 

Largely, the changes propose doing away with the requirement for government approval for industrial or commercial projects in forest areas while also switching projects that are considered “non-forestry” like mining. Adivasis and environmental activists across India had criticised the government for quietly sending the proposal to state governments in English alone. This excluded many concerned communities from the decision-making stage.

This is not the first time the Ministry has discreetly suggested changes to forest laws. On Wednesday, writing for the Morning Context, Akshay Deshmane reported that the Ministry had just scrapped a previous decision to invite private entities to amend the Indian Forest Act 1927. 

According to experts, these amendments would have given the central government more control over forested areas that nowadays enjoy local maintenance and conservation efforts. However, unlike the other forest Acts, the law bestows powers to the state government while dismissing forest-dwellers from decisions regarding the use and demarcation of forests. According to the aforementioned Morning Context report, the ministry has not given up on amending the law,just done away with the idea of bringing in private entities.

Related:

Jal, Jungle, Zameen: Chhattisgarh Adivasis march 300kms to oppose coal mining projects
Dilution of environmental laws, a persistent tactic: AIUFWP
India farmers, Adivasis and forest dwellers condemn FCA draft changes
Forest Conservation Act: GoI suggests fundamental changes Act, despite widespread objections

 

Related Articles

Sunday

03

Jan

Pan-India

Saturday

05

Dec

05 pm onwards

Rise in Rage!

North Gate, JNU campus

Thursday

26

Nov

10 am onwards

Delhi Chalo

Pan India

Theme

Taliban 2021

Taliban in Afghanistan: A look back

Communalism Combat had taken a deep dive into the lives of people of Afghanistan under the Taliban regime. Here we reproduce some of our archives documenting the plight of hapless Afghanis, especially women, who suffered the most under the hardline regime.
2020

Milestones 2020

In the year devastated by the Covid 19 Pandemic, India witnessed apathy against some of its most marginalised people and vilification of dissenters by powerful state and non state actors. As 2020 draws to a close, and hundreds of thousands of Indian farmers continue their protest in the bitter North Indian cold. Read how Indians resisted all attempts to snatch away fundamental and constitutional freedoms.
Migrant Diaries

Migrant Diaries

The 2020 COVID pandemic brought to fore the dismal lives that our migrant workers lead. Read these heartbreaking stories of how they lived before the pandemic, how the lockdown changed their lives and what they’re doing now.
Delhi HC

Hate Speech and Delhi Pogrom 2020

A spate of provocative speeches, that amount to hate speech in law and should be prosecuted allowed blood letting to spill on the streets of north east Delhi in February-March 2020

Campaigns

Sunday

03

Jan

Pan-India

Saturday

05

Dec

05 pm onwards

Rise in Rage!

North Gate, JNU campus

Thursday

26

Nov

10 am onwards

Delhi Chalo

Pan India

Videos

Dalit Bahujan Adivasi

Why are Adivasis protesting against power projects in Ajodhya Hills?

Adivasis and local residents, opposed to the newly proposed hydel power project in the remote Ajodhya Hills in West Bengal, are heightening their prolonged protests against these projects. Watch this sabrangindia exclusive to hear what Adivasi Activists, local residents, forest dwellers and environmentalists have to say.

Dalit Bahujan Adivasi

Why are Adivasis protesting against power projects in Ajodhya Hills?

Adivasis and local residents, opposed to the newly proposed hydel power project in the remote Ajodhya Hills in West Bengal, are heightening their prolonged protests against these projects. Watch this sabrangindia exclusive to hear what Adivasi Activists, local residents, forest dwellers and environmentalists have to say.

IN FACT

Analysis

Taliban 2021

Taliban in Afghanistan: A look back

Communalism Combat had taken a deep dive into the lives of people of Afghanistan under the Taliban regime. Here we reproduce some of our archives documenting the plight of hapless Afghanis, especially women, who suffered the most under the hardline regime.
2020

Milestones 2020

In the year devastated by the Covid 19 Pandemic, India witnessed apathy against some of its most marginalised people and vilification of dissenters by powerful state and non state actors. As 2020 draws to a close, and hundreds of thousands of Indian farmers continue their protest in the bitter North Indian cold. Read how Indians resisted all attempts to snatch away fundamental and constitutional freedoms.
Migrant Diaries

Migrant Diaries

The 2020 COVID pandemic brought to fore the dismal lives that our migrant workers lead. Read these heartbreaking stories of how they lived before the pandemic, how the lockdown changed their lives and what they’re doing now.
Delhi HC

Hate Speech and Delhi Pogrom 2020

A spate of provocative speeches, that amount to hate speech in law and should be prosecuted allowed blood letting to spill on the streets of north east Delhi in February-March 2020

Archives