Skip to main content
Sabrang
Sabrang
Communalism Politics

New Bengal BJP chief spews communal venom

Sukanta Majumdar continues Dilip Ghosh’s hateful legacy, when focus should be on preventing party men from jumping ship

Sabrangindia 22 Sep 2021

BJP chief West BengalImage Courtesy:timesnownews.com

Trinamool Congress (TMC) has been growing from strength to strength in West Bengal, and with the latest desertion by Babul Supriyo, it was only a matter of time before the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) attempted some form of course correction, or at least assigned the blame and punished someone senior for it. Consequently, Dilip Ghosh was sacked as state BJP chief on Monday evening, and replaced by Sukanta Majumdar.

Majumdar joined the Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh (RSS) as a youth and perhaps this earned him the patronage of the party leadership. The fact that he has a PhD in Botany and is relatively young at 42 years of age, might have added to his perceived appeal among young educated voters. But his very first address showcased that he is just a political novice.

Majumdar took charge as President of the West Bengal BJP in Kolkata on Tuesday and promptly made a series of hateful statements about the minority community in the state in his very first address in this position. The Telegraph quoted him as saying, “The Trinamool Congress is using the people of a certain community to attack Hindus in Bengal.”

What Majumdar perhaps fails to understand is that it wasn’t the dearth of communal diatribe that caused his predecessor to lose his post, but his inability to respect the aspirations of the party’s old and loyal members. Ghosh had ruffled feathers by prioritising TMC turncoats over BJP old hands during the Assembly elections earlier this year, which demoralised the cadres. The result, TMC registered a landslide victory and the BJP were given a sound drubbing in many of their strong bastions.   

Many fear that Majumdar, who has little or no connect with party men outside his own constituency of Balurghat, may be doomed to repeat his predecessor’s mistake. The party needs a leader who can motivate the cadres and hold on to leaders, but Majumdar is a relative novice on that front. And naiveté might explain the short cut he is taking to establish himself as a leader by using communally polarising speech in a state that has remained resolute and proud in its respect for pluralism and diversity. After the high profile exits of Mukul Roy and Babul Supriyo, is Majumdar really the man the BJP needs at the helm in West Bengal?

Related:

Another BJP leader deserts its ship, Babul Supriyo joins TMC: West Bengal
RSS grows in West Bengal, but no match for Didi’s outreach during Covid
How does Dilip Ghosh get away with so much misogyny?
Battleground Bengal: EC bars Dilip Ghosh from campaigning for 24 hours

New Bengal BJP chief spews communal venom

Sukanta Majumdar continues Dilip Ghosh’s hateful legacy, when focus should be on preventing party men from jumping ship

BJP chief West BengalImage Courtesy:timesnownews.com

Trinamool Congress (TMC) has been growing from strength to strength in West Bengal, and with the latest desertion by Babul Supriyo, it was only a matter of time before the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) attempted some form of course correction, or at least assigned the blame and punished someone senior for it. Consequently, Dilip Ghosh was sacked as state BJP chief on Monday evening, and replaced by Sukanta Majumdar.

Majumdar joined the Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh (RSS) as a youth and perhaps this earned him the patronage of the party leadership. The fact that he has a PhD in Botany and is relatively young at 42 years of age, might have added to his perceived appeal among young educated voters. But his very first address showcased that he is just a political novice.

Majumdar took charge as President of the West Bengal BJP in Kolkata on Tuesday and promptly made a series of hateful statements about the minority community in the state in his very first address in this position. The Telegraph quoted him as saying, “The Trinamool Congress is using the people of a certain community to attack Hindus in Bengal.”

What Majumdar perhaps fails to understand is that it wasn’t the dearth of communal diatribe that caused his predecessor to lose his post, but his inability to respect the aspirations of the party’s old and loyal members. Ghosh had ruffled feathers by prioritising TMC turncoats over BJP old hands during the Assembly elections earlier this year, which demoralised the cadres. The result, TMC registered a landslide victory and the BJP were given a sound drubbing in many of their strong bastions.   

Many fear that Majumdar, who has little or no connect with party men outside his own constituency of Balurghat, may be doomed to repeat his predecessor’s mistake. The party needs a leader who can motivate the cadres and hold on to leaders, but Majumdar is a relative novice on that front. And naiveté might explain the short cut he is taking to establish himself as a leader by using communally polarising speech in a state that has remained resolute and proud in its respect for pluralism and diversity. After the high profile exits of Mukul Roy and Babul Supriyo, is Majumdar really the man the BJP needs at the helm in West Bengal?

Related:

Another BJP leader deserts its ship, Babul Supriyo joins TMC: West Bengal
RSS grows in West Bengal, but no match for Didi’s outreach during Covid
How does Dilip Ghosh get away with so much misogyny?
Battleground Bengal: EC bars Dilip Ghosh from campaigning for 24 hours

Related Articles

Sunday

03

Jan

Pan-India

Saturday

05

Dec

05 pm onwards

Rise in Rage!

North Gate, JNU campus

Thursday

26

Nov

10 am onwards

Delhi Chalo

Pan India

Theme

Taliban 2021

Taliban in Afghanistan: A look back

Communalism Combat had taken a deep dive into the lives of people of Afghanistan under the Taliban regime. Here we reproduce some of our archives documenting the plight of hapless Afghanis, especially women, who suffered the most under the hardline regime.
2020

Milestones 2020

In the year devastated by the Covid 19 Pandemic, India witnessed apathy against some of its most marginalised people and vilification of dissenters by powerful state and non state actors. As 2020 draws to a close, and hundreds of thousands of Indian farmers continue their protest in the bitter North Indian cold. Read how Indians resisted all attempts to snatch away fundamental and constitutional freedoms.
Migrant Diaries

Migrant Diaries

The 2020 COVID pandemic brought to fore the dismal lives that our migrant workers lead. Read these heartbreaking stories of how they lived before the pandemic, how the lockdown changed their lives and what they’re doing now.
Delhi HC

Hate Speech and Delhi Pogrom 2020

A spate of provocative speeches, that amount to hate speech in law and should be prosecuted allowed blood letting to spill on the streets of north east Delhi in February-March 2020

Campaigns

Sunday

03

Jan

Pan-India

Saturday

05

Dec

05 pm onwards

Rise in Rage!

North Gate, JNU campus

Thursday

26

Nov

10 am onwards

Delhi Chalo

Pan India

IN FACT

Analysis

Taliban 2021

Taliban in Afghanistan: A look back

Communalism Combat had taken a deep dive into the lives of people of Afghanistan under the Taliban regime. Here we reproduce some of our archives documenting the plight of hapless Afghanis, especially women, who suffered the most under the hardline regime.
2020

Milestones 2020

In the year devastated by the Covid 19 Pandemic, India witnessed apathy against some of its most marginalised people and vilification of dissenters by powerful state and non state actors. As 2020 draws to a close, and hundreds of thousands of Indian farmers continue their protest in the bitter North Indian cold. Read how Indians resisted all attempts to snatch away fundamental and constitutional freedoms.
Migrant Diaries

Migrant Diaries

The 2020 COVID pandemic brought to fore the dismal lives that our migrant workers lead. Read these heartbreaking stories of how they lived before the pandemic, how the lockdown changed their lives and what they’re doing now.
Delhi HC

Hate Speech and Delhi Pogrom 2020

A spate of provocative speeches, that amount to hate speech in law and should be prosecuted allowed blood letting to spill on the streets of north east Delhi in February-March 2020

Archives